Saturday, March 20, 2010

Help for weaker SPM students

Saturday March 20, 2010

Govt to aid students with poor SPM results PUTRAJAYA: The Education Ministry will discuss with the Human Resources Ministry how best to assist students who performed poorly in the SPM examinations.
“We will come up with a way to help the weaker students, so they, too, can succeed,” said Education Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin in his speech during the SPM Excellence Awards 2009 ceremony held at the ministry yesterday.

Muhyiddin, who is also Deputy Prime Minister, said the ministry and related agencies would find ways to assist the students to obtain the necessary skills to ensure they could continue with their education and careers.
Top man and top scorers: Education Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin presenting an award to top Special Category student Tan Bing-Xuan from SMK Ave Maria Convent in Putrajaya while other top students (from left) Khadijah Ahmad Jais (SMK Agama Persekatuan Labu, Negri Sembilan), Grace Kiew Sze-Ern (SMK Sri Aman, Petaling Jaya) and Gladys Tan Yee Kim (SMK Green Road, Kuching) look on. — NORAFIFI EHSAN / The Star
He said schools with less than satisfactory results would not be sidelined, as the ministry would work to narrow the gap in terms of grade averages, especially between urban and rural schools.
The awards ceremony was held to recognise the country’s top 10 schools and 16 students, including two from the Bukit Jalil Sports School and four special students.
Muhyiddin presented certificates and trophies to the recipients, saying they were selected based on their SPM grade average.
The selection of the top 10 schools was based on their average subject grades obtained in the SPM, he added.
Muhyiddin said the ministry had categorised schools into four categories this year – excellent, good, satisfactory and schools with potential – so principals knew the position of their school and could work on increasing their average grade.
Human Resources Minister Datuk Dr S. Subraman iam said the ministry had outlined two pathways to assist students who failed or scored poorly in their SPM examinations last year to be implemented by year’s end.
“One pathway is for those who had failed SPM and the other is for those who had done poorly but got the minimum requirements of four credits,” he said.
He added that these students would not be able to get places to do Form Six, matriculation or enter polytechnics or universities.
He said these students would participate in skills training programmes, which would lead to certificates at different levels.
“Later, they will come together for a common pathway. Those who obtain Level Five certification from the skills training institutes can further their studies in polytechnics to obtain diplomas and degrees,” he added.
Dr Subramaniam said this would create an alternativ e way f or the students to obtain the necessary skills train ing that would lead to professional qualifications.
In an immediate reaction, National Collaborative Parent- Teacher Association of Malaysia president Associate Prof Datuk Mohd Ali Hasan said the suggestion for the two ministries to work together was a good one.
“It should have been done a long time ago. There should be more trade, skills and entreprenueur courses for the s tudents,” he added.
Child psychologist Datuk Dr Chiam Heng Keng felt that this should be done before the students reached the stage of not performing well in public examinations.
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